Analysis of Literary Works

To Kill a Mockingbird

Innocence to Experience // To Kill A Mockingbird

Scout and Jem’s moral growth is a highlighted entity in the novel where as the novel progresses, the children’s maturity process subsequently progresses. Lee constructs different passageways and hurdles in the children’s lives which influences their growth and understanding of their own community as well as the outer world. Their childish innocence consisting of arbitrary …

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Parent-child relationship in To Kill a Mockingbird.

“To Kill a Mockingbird” establishes the role of parenthood through the lives of different characters. Parenting constructs the attitudes of a child when faced with the realities of life, and Harper Lee presents this idea by identifying how good parenting ensures healthy growth and bad parenting can drastically alter a child’s normal life. Atticus is …

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Compare the three children// To Kill A Mockingbird

Harper Lee uses a child as a narrator to her novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird”, where Scout’s role presents the forms of prejudice in Maycomb in an unexaggerated tone. Harper Lee centralizes the novel around children, depicting their own maturity process in accordance with the novel’s development. Scout and Jem are first introduced with Dill …

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‘Courage is not a man with a gun in his hand.’ How does Harper Lee show the theme of courage in this novel?

The act of courage is played out by characters in different forms in ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. It takes place with small acts such as Miss Maudie not complaining when her house is burned down, or acts which changes the entire way of a character is perceived, such as Mrs. Dubose’s fight against her addiction. …

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